31 January 2010

J'ai Mangé du Cheval . . . And It Was GOOD!

The French have quite a few delicacies that we étrangers are not always familiar with.  For example, I tried escargot at my fist meal when I arrived (pretty sure that little snail wasn't too fond of me . . . but quite frankly, the feeling was mutual).  I've eaten foie gras (duck liver paté), lots of moldy cheese, and andouille deGuéméné (pictured to the right, "sausage" specific to the northwest region of Bretagne . . . sausage is putting it gently . . . it's simply rolled up pork intestines).   The andouille is by far the WORST thing I've eaten since arriving.  It was so elastic-y cutting it with anything short of a table saw was insufficient, so each slice had to be eaten whole . . . it was just too much . . . the taste . . . there's really no describing the taste . . . c'était dégueulasse!!  NEVER, NEVER again!   But I actually really enjoy the foie gras and most of the cheeses (the rule for cheese seems to be "the worse it smells, the better it tastes!")


Last night I went out to eat in a quartier of Paris that is knows for it's fabulous little restaurants, St. Germain.  We went to a place called Au Beaujolais (FYI: Beaujolais is a region in central France) and the food was AMAZING!!  I had duck.  It melted in my mouth.  I didn't think it was possible to top that meal.  But today, my dear friend S-P and I had a special treat . . . our ami français, B. gave us a meal to remember.  B. has been promising to cook for us for nearly five months now, so a few weeks ago when we asked him to make cheval for us he willingly agreed.  

I was a little bit hesitant to write this post, as I know many of you out there are going to feel some sort of moral repulsion by this . . . horses fall into that category with dogs and cats for many people.  We Americans don't eat dogs or cats . . . or horses.  But here in France there is an entire division in the meat section just for horse.  Beef . . . Turkey . . . Chicken . . . Pork . . . Horse (the other red meat).  

B. didn't marinate it . . . he didn't cover it with a sauce . . . just straight from the pan to the plate . . . and it was FABULOUS!  Tastes very similar to beef, but with a richer more vibrant flavor.  I would definitely eat it again.     And as a thank you, S-P and I are going to prepare B.'s favorite French meal for him, lapin . . . rabbit.

5 comments:

ginnylou said...

You are so brave, Deb. I'm not sure I could bring myself to try such delicacies!

Anonymous said...

mDeb! Are you horsin' around? xoxox Mom PS: how are you going to prepare the rabbit? Make it cacciatore! It's really good.

Lauren Valentine said...

Interesting what is considered everyday food in other parts of the world. One of my favorite things to eat as a child was cow's tongue, but my parents referred to it as "Granddaddy's ham" so I had no idea what I was eating so regularly as a kid in Austria. Apparently I had Moose in Sweden once...so way to go with the horse!

ginnylou said...

You are so brave, Deb. I'm not sure I could bring myself to try such delicacies!

Lauren Valentine said...

Interesting what is considered everyday food in other parts of the world. One of my favorite things to eat as a child was cow's tongue, but my parents referred to it as "Granddaddy's ham" so I had no idea what I was eating so regularly as a kid in Austria. Apparently I had Moose in Sweden once...so way to go with the horse!